Anytime Audit Course List

  • Beowulf Through Tolkien

    Beowulf Through Tolkien

    This course examines Tolkien and Beowulf together to provide insight into both the classic Old English epic and Tolkien’s modern fantasy works.

  • Beyond Middle-earth

    Beyond Middle-earth

    Join Corey Olsen and Tom Shippey for an in-depth look at the works of J.R.R. Tolkien.

  • C.S. Lewis and Mythologies of Love and Sex

    C.S. Lewis and Mythologies of Love and Sex

    This course explores some of the great mythologies of love that provide a background to today’s culture, sketched out along the twin paths of C.S. Lewis’ The Four Loves and a chronological development of the ideas of love.

  • Celtic Myth in Children’s Fantasy

    Celtic Myth in Children’s Fantasy

    This course examines contemporary fantasy works whose authors have adapted, revised and re-imagined the medieval mythological texts of Ireland and Wales.

  • Chaucer I: Visions of Love

    Chaucer I: Visions of Love

    This class is the first semester in a two-part survey of Chaucer’s major works, looking at his early dream vision poems and his greatest completed work: Troilus and Criseyde.

  • Chaucer II: The Canterbury Tales

    Chaucer II: The Canterbury Tales

    In this class we will study one of the great classics of English literature, The Canterbury Tales, in which we see Chaucer at the height of his poetic abilities, mixing sensitive characterization with stunningly complex storytelling.

  • Classical Myths and Legends

    Classical Myths and Legends

    This course puts the myths and legends of the Classical world in their wider cultural and historical contexts.

  • Elementary Latin I

    Elementary Latin I

    Elementary Latin I is an intensive course designed to introduce you to the basic elements of the Latin language.

  • Elementary Latin II

    Elementary Latin II

    The second semester of Elementary Latin completes the introduction to the basic elements of the Latin language, emphasizing the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.

  • Exploring Star Trek

    Exploring Star Trek

    Amy Sturgis boldly takes Signum where it’s never gone before: into Star Trek!

  • Folkloric Transformations: Vampires & Big Bad Wolves

    Folkloric Transformations: Vampires & Big Bad Wolves

    This course explores the transformations of folklore in modern literature, film, and TV, focusing primarily on vampires, as well as fairy tale creatures.

  • Germanic Myths and Legends

    Germanic Myths and Legends

    This course puts the myths and legends of the medieval Germanic world in their wider cultural and historical contexts.

  • Introduction to Germanic Philology I

    Introduction to Germanic Philology I

    This class offers a survey of the older Germanic languages (especially Gothic, Old Norse, and Old English), and the literatures written in those languages.

  • Introduction to Germanic Philology II

    Introduction to Germanic Philology II

    This class provides an introduction to Germanic comparative philology in a broad sense. Students are not expected to have prior familiarity with any language other than modern English.

  • Introduction to Old English

    Introduction to Old English

    This course provides an introduction to Old English grammar, giving students a working reading competency in the language and the chance to put that knowledge into practice.

  • Introduction to Old Norse

    Introduction to Old Norse

    The first half of this course provides a focus on Old Icelandic grammar, and the second half allows students to begin reading from a selection of Old Icelandic prose and poetic texts.

  • Introduction to the Gothic Language

    Introduction to the Gothic Language

    This course will introduce students to the basics of the Gothic language and grammar and set the language within its historical and literary context.

  • Language Invention Through Tolkien

    Language Invention Through Tolkien

    This course will explore language invention through the works of the greatest and most prolific inventors of language for fictional works and world building – J.R.R. Tolkien.

  • Lewis & Tolkien

    Lewis & Tolkien

    In this course, students will examine the friendship and works of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, and their influence upon each other.

  • Literary Copernicus: The Cosmic Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft

    Literary Copernicus: The Cosmic Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft

    This course explores the work of H.P. Lovecraft and his impact on literature and popular culture. Students will study the foundations of Lovecraft’s writing, the meaning behind his works, along with his cosmic vision and legacy.

  • Literature, Film, and Technoculture

    Literature, Film, and Technoculture

    This course surveys a range of literary and cinematic narratives that explore the growth, acceleration, and consequences of modern technoculture. Works of literature will be placed alongside films and embedded historically within debates and developments.

  • Modern Fantasy I

    Modern Fantasy I

    This course explores fantasy literature written within the past 50 years, with an examination of the works of six top modern fantasy authors: Peter Beagle, Ursula Le Guin, Neil Gaiman, Jim Butcher, Garth Nix, and George R. R. Martin.

  • Modern Fantasy II

    Modern Fantasy II

    This course explores fantasy literature written over the past 60 years with an examination of the works of six modern fantasy authors.

  • Norse Myths and Sagas

    Norse Myths and Sagas

    This course provides an introduction to the myths and sagas of medieval Scandinavia.

  • Philology Through Tolkien

    Philology Through Tolkien

    This course uses the life and works of Tolkien as an introduction to the discipline of comparative philology and to highlight the many links between this field and his creative writings. The course offers an introductory overview of several Germanic languages and their literatures, such as Gothic, Old and Middle English, and Old Norse, and covers select topics in Germanic comparative grammar.

  • Roots of the Mountain

    Roots of the Mountain

    This course studies Tolkien’s works in relation to the fantasy literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

  • Science Fiction Part I

    Science Fiction Part I

    Join award-winning scholar Dr. Amy H. Sturgis as she explores the ways in which the literature of science fiction over time has asked the question: “What if?”

  • Science Fiction Part II

    Science Fiction Part II

    Join award-winning scholar Dr. Amy H. Sturgis as she explores the ways in which the literature of science fiction over time has asked the question: “What if?”

  • Shakespeare and the Middle Ages

    Shakespeare and the Middle Ages

    The course examines Shakespeare’s Comedies in the context of their medieval literary sources, his Histories in light of Tudor views of the recent medieval past, and his Tragedies in the context of medieval beliefs and cosmologies.

  • Sherlock, Science, and Ratiocination

    Sherlock, Science, and Ratiocination

    This course focuses on Edgar Allan Poe and Conan Doyle and how their works blended scientific method, mystery, and imagination to create the modern literature of detection.

  • The Arthur Story

    The Arthur Story

    This course explores King Arthur from his beginnings in the historical record in the late 5th/early 6th century through Tennyson’s idealistic vision of the great King in the late 19th century.

  • The Dystopian Tradition

    The Dystopian Tradition

    This class will consider historical and current “what if?” thought experiments, including classics such as 1984 and bestsellers like The Hunger Games.

  • The Force of Star Wars: Examining the Epic

    The Force of Star Wars: Examining the Epic

    This course explores the creation of the Star Wars canon, its history as a cultural phenomenon and its staying power as a story.

  • The Gothic Tradition

    The Gothic Tradition

    This course will investigate the fascinating and subversive Gothic imagination, identify the historical conditions that have inspired it, and consider how it has developed across time and place and medium.

  • The Inklings and King Arthur

    The Inklings and King Arthur

    This course explores how J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and other Inklings authors interpreted the Arthurian legends in their work.

  • The Inklings and Science Fiction

    The Inklings and Science Fiction

    This course covers the Inklings’ creative and personal encounters with science fiction.

  • The Life and Times of the English Epic

    The Life and Times of the English Epic

    In this course, students will study the evolution of the English Epic over time.

  • The Meaning of Star Wars

    The Meaning of Star Wars

    This May the Fourth, join Dr. Amy H. Sturgis as she explores Star Wars from its inception through its many reinventions and innovations to find its true meaning(s).

  • The Potter Saga

    The Potter Saga

    In this course, students will discuss the ancestors to the Harry Potter phenomenon, while examining the works and traditions that inform the Harry Potter universe.

  • The Return of King Arthur

    The Return of King Arthur

    This course explores modern retellings of the Arthurian legend in novels, poetry, plays, films, short stories, and comics.

  • The Story of the Hobbit

    The Story of the Hobbit

    This course examines the life of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, including several important precursors of the book, works that helped establish the genre in which Tolkien was writing, and which influenced Tolkien’s own thinking.

  • The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien

    John Garth delves into theories concerning geography, nationhood, and the environment to explore Tolkien’s primary and fictional worlds.

  • Tolkien & Tradition

    Tolkien & Tradition

    This course helps students learn to evaluate Tolkien’s works both individually and comparatively, judging them in the context of each other as well as of their sources.

  • Tolkien in Context

    Tolkien in Context

    This course examines how Tolkien’s subcreated world of Middle-earth engages with issues and concepts relevant to readers, including racism, immigration, the place of women, the ongoing battle of good versus evil, environmental concerns and the rise of technology.

  • Tolkien’s Poetry

    Tolkien’s Poetry

    In this class, we will examine Tolkien’s short poetic works in detail, taking a chronological look at Tolkien’s career through the window of his poetry.

  • Tolkien’s World of Middle-earth

    Tolkien’s World of Middle-earth

    In this course, students will read Tolkien’s critical essays, translations, and imaginative stories to explore how his world and his myth developed over time.

  • Tolkien’s Wars and Middle-earth

    Tolkien’s Wars and Middle-earth

    This course explores the life of J.R.R. Tolkien and the impact his experiences had on his work, with a particular focus on the World War I and World War II time periods.

  • Ursula K. Le Guin: Worldbuilder

    Ursula K. Le Guin: Worldbuilder

    This course explores the major science fiction and fantasy works of Ursula K. Le Guin, how they relate to her literary theories and social interests, and how she envisioned and revisioned the worlds of her imagination.