Courses

Science Fiction, Part II

Join award-winning scholar Dr. Amy H. Sturgis as she explores the ways in which the literature of science fiction over time has asked the question: “What if?”

The Dystopian Tradition

This class will consider historical and current “what if?” thought experiments, including classics such as 1984 and bestsellers like The Hunger Games.

Science Fiction, Part I

Join award-winning scholar Dr. Amy H. Sturgis as she explores the ways in which the literature of science fiction over time has asked the question: “What if?”

The Inklings and King Arthur

This course explores how J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and other Inklings authors interpreted the Arthurian legends in their work.

The Life and Times of the English Epic

In this course, students will study the evolution of the English Epic over time.

Modern Fantasy II

This course explores fantasy literature written over the past 60 years with an examination of the works of six modern fantasy authors.

Philology Through Tolkien

This course uses the life and works of Tolkien as an introduction to the discipline of comparative philology and to highlight the many links between this field and his creative writings. The course offers an introductory overview of several Germanic languages and their literatures, such as Gothic, Old and Middle English, and Old Norse, and covers select topics in Germanic comparative grammar.

The Inklings and Science Fiction

This course covers the Inklings’ creative and personal encounters with science fiction.

Elementary Latin II

The second semester of Elementary Latin completes the introduction to the basic elements of the Latin language, emphasizing the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.

C.S. Lewis and Mythologies of Love and Sex

This course explores some of the great mythologies of love that provide a background to today’s culture, sketched out along the twin paths of C.S. Lewis’ The Four Loves and a chronological development of the ideas of love.