Courses

The Great Tales: Tolkien & the Epic

In this course, students will study Tolkien’s longest epics in the context of “The Great Tales” that Tolkien admired. Taking the works in their own context, as well as studying Tolkien’s scholarly interest in these works and their overall contribution to the tradition will be the focus of this course.

Chaucer I: Visions of Love

This class is the first semester in a two-part survey of Chaucer’s major works, looking at his early dream vision poems and his greatest completed work: Troilus and Criseyde.

Research Methods

This course will introduce students to MLA citation style, standard bibliographic and research practices, literary theories of the later 20th century, and possible scholarly directions in the 21st century.

Chaucer II: The Canterbury Tales

What is up with the frame narrative of Canterbury Tales? Why should we care about the Canterbury Tales today? In this class we will study of the great classics of English literature: Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.  In the Tales, we see Chaucer at the height of his poetic abilities, mixing sensitive characterization and stunning complexity of storytelling with his […]

Beowulf in Old English

This intensive, seminar-style class will give students an opportunity to practice translating the Old English language and to become intimately familiar with the Beowulf text.

Modern Fantasy

This course explores fantasy literature written within the past 50 years, with an examination of the works of six top modern fantasy authors: Peter Beagle, Ursula Le Guin, Neil Gaiman, Jim Butcher, Garth Nix, and George R. R. Martin.

The Arthur Story

This course explores King Arthur from his beginnings in the historical record in the late 5th/early 6th century through Tennyson’s idealistic vision of the great King in the late 19th century.

The Inklings and Science Fiction

Of the various men in the writer’s group the Inklings who met in Oxford primarily during the 1930s and 1940s, two achieved world renown with their writings: C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. Each had a strong interest in the developing field of science fiction. This course covers the Inklings’ creative and personal encounters with science fiction.

Master’s Thesis: Language & Literature

This is a one-semester, three-credit course during which students will write their thesis, the culminating project for an M.A. in Language & Literature. Prerequisite: LITZ6398: Thesis Research

Thesis Planning: Language & Literature

This is a one-semester, three-credit course that consists of reading, research, and assignments completed in one-on-one consultation with a Director.

Students may register for this course only after their thesis topic is approved by the thesis coordinator.

Page 1 of 512345
TOP